Press Releases

11 Detroit high schools to host college advisers to prepare students for college

Programs place recent college graduates directly in schools to help students

DETROIT – Eleven high schools in Detroit have welcomed a trained college adviser this fall for the 2018-2019 school year. The Detroit-based advisers are among 98 college advisers from three college advising programs serving across the state with the goal of helping more students pursue higher education.  

 

The advisers are recent college graduates and participated in an intense summer training program through one of the three advising programs: AdviseMI, Michigan State University College Advising Corps (MSUCAC) or Michigan College Advising Corps (MCAC) program. Detroit College Access Network will support the schools and advisers.

 

“Many of our students will be the first in their families to attend college. They may not have anyone to support them with the often-confusing process for applying to and enrolling in postsecondary education. It is a game changer to have college advisers in Detroit high schools. They provide one-on-one support for our students and families to finalize and make a reality their postsecondary education plan,” said Ashley Johnson, executive director of the Detroit College Access Network.  

 

Advisers from AdviseMI, MSUCAC and MCAC will work alongside high school counselors to create and foster a college-going atmosphere among students in the eleven Detroit high schools. They will support students in exploring higher education options, applying to college, and making a successful transition to college. Adviser responsibilities include helping students set a postsecondary education goal, preparing for college admissions exams, completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form, securing financial aid and formally enrolling in a higher education program.

 

“The number one challenge I must overcome at Cody is inspiring my students that they will succeed in college. You will always hear the students comment that they’re not interested in college and that is usually fueled by misinformation. If a student is inspired, they will go above and beyond the requirements to ensure that they will succeed. This leads to success when they are long past graduated, and I want every student in Cody to be successful,” said Antoine Douglas, college adviser at Cody-Medicine and Community Health Academy.

The AdviseMI program hires recent graduates from 18 partner colleges, including Adrian College, Alma College, Calvin College, Central Michigan University, Eastern Michigan University, Ferris State University, Grand Valley State University, Kalamazoo College, Madonna University, Northern Michigan University, Oakland University, Olivet College, Saginaw Valley State University, Siena Heights University, University of Michigan-Dearborn, University of Michigan-Flint, Wayne State University and Western Michigan University.

 

AdviseMI college advisers and high schools include:

                Detroit School of Arts - Daniell May, Siena Heights University

                Henry Ford High School - Rhonda Jones, University of Michigan Flint

                Martin Luther King Jr. Senior High School - Juanita Gool, Wayne State University

                Voyageur College Preparatory - Lauren Thompkins, Michigan State University

 

Michigan State University College Advising Corps advisers are all recent graduates of Michigan State University. The MSUCAC college advisers and high schools include:

               Cody - Medicine and Community Health Academy - Antoine Douglas, Michigan State University

               Detroit Cristo Rey - Jassadi Moore, Michigan State University

               Frederick Douglass & West Side Academy - Luke Dzwonkowski, Michigan State University

               Osborn High School - Summer Tolbert, Michigan State University

 

Michigan College Advising Corps advisers are all recent graduates of University of Michigan. The MCAC college advisers and high schools include:

                Chandler Park Academy - Tiffany Hackett, University of Michigan

                Jalen Rose Academy - Aliyah Spotts, University of Michigan

 

For more information about the Michigan State University College Advising Corps program, visit www.collegeadvisingcorps.msu.edu.

 

For more information about the Michigan College Advising Corps program, visit

https://ceo.umich.edu/project/michigan-college-advising-corps-mcac/.

 

For more information about the AdviseMI program, visit www.micollegeaccess.org/statewide-initiatives/advisemi.

Race to the FAFSA Line Challenge Winners 

Macomb, Oakland and Wayne County Students Participating in FAFSA Challenge to Receive Nearly $54 Million in        Student Aid

Detroit, Mich. (April 3, 2018) – More than 6,500 students in Macomb, Oakland and Wayne counties that participated in the Detroit Regional Chamber’s annualRace to the FAFSA Line challenge will receive an estimated $53.5 million in funding from completing their Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). For the second year, the Chamber’s Detroit Drives Degrees initiative held the challenge to encourage high school seniors to apply for college aid and increase the regional completion rate.

 

The Chamber launched the challenge last year, but despite the hard work of school counselors and local college access networks, Southeast Michigan students left potentially $167 million in federal aid on the table by not filling out the FAFSA. According to the National College Access Network, high school graduates who complete the FAFSA are 63 percent more likely to enroll in college.

 

The goal of the challenge is to increase FAFSA completion among high school seniors in Macomb, Oakland and Wayne counties to 65 percent and encourage them to take the next step to postsecondary education. The current completion rate for the three counties is 50 percent, and will increase through the open application period, which closes on June 30.

 

Sixty-five schools throughout Macomb, Oakland and Wayne counties registered for the competition. The 2018 winners include:

 

  • Grand Prize Winner for Overall Most Improved FAFSA Completion: Frontier International Academy (Detroit) 45 percentage point improvement.

 

  • Most Improved FAFSA Completion for Medium Schools: Cesar Chavez Academy High School (Detroit) 31 percentage point improvement.

 

  • Most Improved FAFSA Completion for Large Schools: Fordson High School (Dearborn), 11 percentage point improvement.

 

  • Most Innovative FAFSA Completion Strategy: Voyageur College Preparatory High School (Detroit) 65 percent completion rate.

 

  • Highest Overall FAFSA Completion Rate: Trillium Academy (Taylor) 84 percent completion rate.

 

As grand prize winner, Frontier International Academy will be awarded an all-day senior class party and the four other winners will receive VIP movie screenings, courtesy of Emagine Entertainment.

 

The challenge was a collaborative effort involving the following partners: Detroit College Access Network (DCAN), Emagine Entertainment, Michigan College Access Network (MCAN), Oakland Schools, Wayne RESA, and several local college access networks. The challenge was supported by: Chemical Bank, the Detroit Pistons, DTE Energy, Grand Valley State University Charter Schools Office, Independent Bank, Kerkstra Precast and the University of Michigan-Dearborn.

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Boost Detroit’s talent pipeline

Amazon’s decision to pass on Detroit for a second headquarters should be a wake-up call that we must increase our percentages of adults in Detroit and Michigan with high-quality postsecondary education credentials and degrees. 

Just look at the some of the cities that made Amazon’s top 20 list of finalists.

About 40 percent of adults in Columbus, Ohio, have an associate degree or higher, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. In Chicago and Pittsburgh, 43 percent have an associate degree or higher. Atlanta has a 44 percent degree attainment rate. For the Detroit region as a whole, 38 percent of adults over 25 have an associate degree or higher. In the city of Detroit, just 14 percent of adults have at least a bachelor’s degree. Statewide, 43 percent of adults in Michigan have a postsecondary credential or degree, according to the Lumina Foundation. Nationally, 35 other states have a higher percentage of adults with postsecondary education.

We need more highly-skilled computer programmers. We need more skilled nurses. We need more journeyman plumbers. We need more certificate-carrying coders.

Simply put, we need more of everything.

Our college-educated talent pipeline is just not as big as it needs to be to meet the needs of Amazon’s demand of filling 50,000 tech worker jobs over the next decade.

We must do better. And that starts by getting more high school students to pursue postsecondary educational opportunities for two-year and four-year degrees, skilled trades, apprenticeships and technical education certificates.

11 Detroit high schools to host college advisers to prepare students for college


Programs place recent college graduates directly in schools to help students

 

DETROIT – Eleven high schools in Detroit have welcomed a trained college adviser this fall for the 2017-2018 school year. The advisers were specially trained through the Michigan College Access Network’s AdviseMI program and Michigan State University’s College Advising Corps program.

 

The Detroit-based advisers are among 100 college advisers serving across the state with the goal of helping more students pursue higher education. All of the advisers are recent college graduates and participated in an intense four-week training program this summer. Detroit College Access Network will support the schools and advisers.

 

Advisers from both AdviseMI and the MSU College Advising Corps will work alongside high school counselors to create and foster a college-going atmosphere among students in the 11 Detroit high schools. They will support students in exploring higher education options, applying to college, and making a successful transition to college. Adviser responsibilities include helping students set a postsecondary education goal, preparing for college admissions exams, completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form, securing financial aid and formally enrolling in a higher education program.

 

“As a recent college graduate coming from an intense training program, we believe this adviser will help our postsecondary education efforts,” Michelle Parker, principal of Cody-Medicine and Community Health Academy said. “Our school welcomes Antoine Douglas and we look forward to a coordinated effort to improve the number of students pursuing postsecondary education in our community.”

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Detroit College Challenge seeks to boost enrollment

Get Schooled Detroit seeks to boost the numbers of Detroit students who enroll, stay in and graduate from college.

DETROIT — High school senior De’Auna Barnes wants to study nursing in college. Michigan State University, Alma College and Albion College are among the institutions to which she has been accepted. Still, as Barnes works to finish her last year of high school at Voyager Academy in Detroit, the demands of applying to multiple schools, searching for scholarships and juggling critical deadlines can sometimes be too much. “The whole process is kind of stressful. I get overwhelmed sometimes,” said Barnes, 17.

Barnes and thousands of high school students like her in Detroit are getting help, information and support through a program called the Detroit College Challenge as they navigate the complex process of applying to college.

The program, a partnership between the Detroit College Access Network and the nonprofit Get Schooled, seeks to boost the numbers of Detroit students who enroll, stay in and graduate from college.

The challenge is an initiative that encourages high school students across the city to engage with the website Get Schooled Detroit. The program is funded by a grant from General Motors Co.

To read more, click HERE.